Chantal Joffe asks; What is it like to be somebody else?

Chantal Joffe, Stuart Bush Studio Blog

Chantal Joffe, Esme on the Blue Sofa, 2018 Oil on canvas 152.3 x 305 cm 60 x 120 1/8 in © Chantal Joffe, Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro, London/Venice

The first thing I noticed about Chantal Joffe’s paintings at Victoria Miro, in London, is that they challenge the concept of beauty.  Joffe paints the female figure, often in unstinting and frank disclosure.  There is a directness that is fascinating, every blemish and every wort is on show.  From the gradual decay of the sitters through to the triumph of their existence, Joffe painting’s depicts and embodies her muses.  By portraying the intensity of the moment, she gives the viewer passage to understand how they feel.  The gritty truth of life is there for all to see as it comes slapped down in a painterly splurge.  It is in Joffe’s nature to dig deep and get below the surface.
Chantal Joffe’s (b. 1969) career started after studying at Glasgow School of Art (1988 – 1991) and the Royal College of Art (1992-1994).  Since then her art has been exhibited at prestigious galleries in UK, USA and across Europe.  She won the Charles Wollaston Award in 2006 and has work in a wide selection of gallery and museum collections around the world.

Chantal Joffe asks; What is it like to be somebody else?

Etel Adnan shows colour alone is all the painter needs
Thankfully, I have seen Joffe’s work a handful of times before, and I can recall the psychological and emotional force I witnessed in her work.  In this show, there are only eleven paintings, so there are less to delve into.  They remind me of a quick and frenetic game of Rugby Union Sevens. After a few quick masterful plays, it is all over in a flash. I wish I had more to enjoy.

"Chantal

The paintings mainly focus on Joffe’s niece Esme, with one picture of Bella and one of a young man named Faun.  Joffe questions the existential vacuum we all experience, by unpicking the question; What is it like to be someone else?  She depicts the individual and delves deep to actualise her sitter’s purpose and inner hopes.  Joffe has realised that we all seek to understand and fulfil the meaning of our existence.  Joffe tries to achieve this by going beyond the facade that we allow others to see.  Thereby allowing a whole variety of probable meanings to become visible, as she seeks to depict life as it really is.

Chantal Joffe asks; What is it like to be somebody else?

Chantal Joffe RA: If I can paint, I can deal with it
Joffe often connects the solitary female figure with history. She does this by painting not only the sitter but also what she knows about the sitter in each portrait.  Often Joffe’s regular sitters are members of her family that she has a kinship with, mixed with images from magazines.  Joffe doesn’t like working on what is imagined; she paints what to her is truly real.
In Esme at the Diner,(2019) Joffe swerves the brush well clear of the trap of perfectionism and judgement as she forgets about right or wrong.  The moment the brush touches the apple green coloured canvas honesty is all that matters.  The painting shows Joffe integrity as she grapples the painting into being.  Joffe says, “You always going to struggle your whole life, and if weren’t struggling you wouldn’t be an artist.”

"Chantal

Joffe subconscious intentions lead the paintings forward.   An action unlocks the following response as she reveals a startling beautiful portrayal.   A concession of quick strokes shows the strength which comes from the gesticulations and dribbles and adds to the feel of life.  The formal qualities all come together resulting in a painting that radiates a strong commanding composition.

Chantal Joffe asks; What is it like to be somebody else?

Tracey Emin: I cried because I love you
The love and passion for painting are there to see in the quick, decisive marks. It’s all about the present tense as Joffe is in the moment, she is aware and fully present. She is at one with the fresh, clean, luscious pigment on her brush.  Joffe doesn’t have to think about where the brush is going, her impulse comes in a spontaneous bout.  She has a natural feeling of knowing where every swerve of paint needs to be.  At this level of supreme creativity, it is a case of her feeling where the painting is leading Joffe as the muse inhabits her vital spirit.  As a result, the pictures are a record of her painterly playfulness.  Chantal Joffe says, “[Painting] is like dancing on a pin, if you want to dance on a pin that is a pretty exciting thing, it’s like climbing mountain.”
As she extends into her passion for painting, Joffe forgets herself and becomes at one with the sitter.  As she directs her attention on to the plight of another, the more human she becomes.  Through painting, Joffe adds to our meaning and understanding of being human, allowing us to move beyond our own inner terminal.  Rather than just living, Joffe’s paintings give us something to live for.  We are in this together.  No matter how much we are pushed into this ongoing rat race, Joffe reveals what it is really about; a spectrum togetherness of energy, purpose and meaning.

"Chantal

Chantal Joffe exhibition at the Victoria Miro, London from 11 April – 18 May 2019 

Chantal Joffe asks; What is it like to be somebody else?

David Salle undressing the role of the artist and the writer

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