Artist’s life

Rebound from a failed painting

I was taught at school that everything had to be right.  I was encouraged to conform so that when I grew up I would make a good employee. Education was stifling.  I was urged to aim for perfection; however, I was a long way away from achieving that.  Sketching and doodling were discouraged, learning from failure was hindered.  As a consequence, I had no idea how to rebound from a failed painting. When I started to learn to paint I use to stop, look and make a judgment about my progress. I worried I was wasting my time and making a blunder.  I hated being wrong. It is a struggle to complete… Read More »Rebound from a failed painting

Painter Killed By Critique Of His Own Bad Art

Most artists share the same fear and dread, a bad review!  You think it’s all over.  It makes you feel reluctant to share your work. I can imagine the day a museum curator knocks on my studio door with good news, and there is no answer.  The bell keeps ringing…. The curator keeps trying to get an answer until he/she realises something terrible might have happened.  Eventually, they gain access to find me dead under an incredible amount of bad art.  So much so that they can just see two feet sticking out of the bottom. Do they run for help? No, they are horrified by how much bad art… Read More »Painter Killed By Critique Of His Own Bad Art

I love my work more than what it produces

I am happiest when I realise that there is something to investigate, something that doesn’t quite fit.  I love the slow development of an idea.  The slow convergence of thoughts that often come after a period of incubation. l realise then that there is a problem worth tackling, a problem that is going to become my muse.  It is exciting to think that possibly, this concept hasn’t occurred to anyone else.  If it has occurred to someone before me, they will likely approached it in a completely different way.  I love my work more than what it produces.   I love going deeper, I just follow my hunch and allow… Read More »I love my work more than what it produces

It takes discipline to have creative freedom

I crave for a life without physical, mental or financial constraints.  It has been my intention not to have limits on what I do, what I say or how I spend my time.  I want to make what I want, when I want.  One of the attractions of being an artist is the concept of free expression.  However, our culture, often wires us up to do what is safe and sensible.  In my experience, it takes discipline to have creative freedom.     Commercial art is a good, sensible way of making a living from art.  It has a project outline, a list of do’s and don’ts and set deadlines. To get paid you… Read More »It takes discipline to have creative freedom

Stuart Bush Studio Blog, an art collectors role in society, ha has never been in love, he doesn't know what love is

An art collector’s role in society

What is an Art Collector’s role in society? In Malcolm Gladwell’s book, ‘David and Goliath, Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants,’  the book starts with the story about the conventional interpretation of the familiar biblical tale of David and Goliath.  Gladwell explains that in his interpretation of the story, David is the symbol of the underdog. The story made me think about the art collectors role in a society searching for a ‘David’.  The underdog is often a unique and very capable individual that is often underestimated. In Gladwell’s book, David’s sling is a devastating weapon.  It was one of the most feared weapons in the ancient world. The… Read More »An art collector’s role in society

Finding a love for collecting art

I believe finding a love for collecting art is about finding an artist with a kindred spirit to yourself.  Artists critique all areas of life, from nature to politics to the social system.  They look not just on the surface, but they investigate and ask questions in order to seek new meanings and associations.     When I come across a work that l feel a connection with, I write down the artist’s name.  I also Iook for websites and galleries that exhibit the said artist’s work, and I join their mailing lists. I can then delight in opening my inbox and finding compelling communication.   My advice is to broaden your… Read More »Finding a love for collecting art

My typical day as a painter

Since I have been a parent, my typical day as a painter starts with waking up between 6 and 6:30 am.   I have a clear head in the morning and I have learnt to appreciate this early start as it allows me to catch up with any writing l have to do.    Everyone else in the house is up by 7:30 and then l enjoy spending quality time with the family.  I help my boys with their homework and get them ready for school. I really appreciate these enjoyable family moments.  I look forward to the short walk to school.  On the way back I have the opportunity to start thinking about… Read More »My typical day as a painter

Wishing for dyslexia

I recently read a book by Malcolm Gladwell called David and Goliath. The theme of the book highlights how we are misled about the nature of our advantages and disadvantages.  Gladwell explains that it isn’t always correct that our disadvantages preventing us being successful in life.  “We have a definition in our heads of what an advantage is — and the definition isn’t right. And what happens as a result? It means that we make mistakes. It means that we misread battles between underdogs and giants. It means that we underestimate how much freedom there can be in what looks like a disadvantage.”   In chapter four, Gladwell starts with the question,… Read More »Wishing for dyslexia

©Stuart Bush, untitled photograph

A painters approach to street photography

I found the question of where to start as an artist after art school an easy one. I had a desire to capture something about now; the present moment in the city.  My camera seemed an obvious place to start. I picked up my camera and took pictures.  Cartier Bresson labelled it “the decisive moment.”  I wanted to capture a split second of an ever-changing mad rush.  By doing so, I found a way to make art; I discovered a painters approach to street photography. My walk with a camera started with no intention of where I was going; not in my steps and not in my art.  Each time I went out with… Read More »A painters approach to street photography

Dyslexia isn’t going to stop me

I avoided practising my reading and writing skills as I grew up. I easily slipped through the net due to changing schools several times. It took me a long time to read a book, however, I started to enjoy reading in my twenties. At 27 years old I was diagnosed with dyslexia. It took me a while to realise that dyslexia wasn’t going to stop me.   I didn’t enjoy writing before I had a blog. I always felt my writing was poor. The way I used to get my ideas down on paper was confused and in a jumble. In spite of that, I believed that my ideas and content were good. It used to… Read More »Dyslexia isn’t going to stop me