Art reviews

Art exhibition reviews by Stuart Bush

Kerry James Marshall: History of painting

Kerry James Marshall, the American artist, is increasingly being recognised as a significant painter and modern master.  His work confronts questions about what is represented in art and more importantly what has been left out.  In this review of Kerry James Marshall: History of Painting at David Zwirner’s gallery in London, I want to look at the way Marshall uses in-depth knowledge and understanding of art history to inform his work and inspire a new generation of artists.     Kerry James Marshall was born in Birmingham, Alabama and grew up in Los Angles.  He currently lives in Chicago.  At the beginning of Marshall’s journey to becoming a successful artist, he started, like most… Read More »Kerry James Marshall: History of painting

A review of Sean Scully’s work by Stuart Bush

A review of Sean Scully’s work – ‘Uninsideout’ exhibition, BlainSouthern London until 17th November Sean Scully, What Makes Us, 2017. ©Sean Scully Courtesy of the artist and BlainSouthern, Photo Peter Mallet In a career spanning 6 decades, Sean Scully in 2018 has 10 solo shows around the world, including an exhibition of sculpture at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park until 6 January 2019.  During this review of Sean Scully’s work at ‘Uninsideout’ exhibition at BlainSouthern in London, I want to discuss Scully’s approach to the use form and colour and the intensity in his work.   The Irish born abstract painter Sean Scully grow up in London.  He later moved to New… Read More »A review of Sean Scully’s work by Stuart Bush

Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review

Tomma Abts (1967) is a German-born painter who lives in London. In 2006 Tomma won the Turner Prize and has since gone on to exhibit in many institutions around the world.  In this Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review, I want to discuss her interesting static compositions and consider what I think the artist wants to say through the work.   Tomma Abts’s quiet and unique work could never be described as pretty.  Her strange visual illusions at first glance look like 1950s wallpaper.  Each painting contains zigzags, puzzles and twists on her trademark sized 48 x 38cm canvases. Tomma worked mainly on canvases of this size for the last 20 years, only recently… Read More »Tomma Abts Serpentine exhibition review

Review of ‘All too human, Bacon, Freud and a century of painting life’ Tate Britain

  ‘All too human, Bacon, Freud and a century of painting life’ at Tate Britain, begins by following British painting after the Second World War. At this time in our history rumours about what had happened during the Holocaust were trickling into the media. During this period many books and essays were written as people tried to come to terms with what had taken place. This experience encouraged intellectuals to look inwards and ask hard questions about the purpose of human existence.    It was complexing to hear about the atrocities and then to consider how humans could behave in such a way. The central theme of this exhibition looked at… Read More »Review of ‘All too human, Bacon, Freud and a century of painting life’ Tate Britain

Before, During and ‘Afterimage’ – a review of Sarah Sze exhibition at Victoria Miro Gallery, London.

Sarah Sze is well known for her sculptures of large-scale installations. When l walked into the exhibition I was immediately meet by the flood of ideas. Sarah stimulating installations take the detritus from the frame, and her work appears to explode as if trying to escape.  She instinctively relies on her painter’s instincts, as ‘Afterimage’ takes a closer look at the artist’s working practices as she looks at the relationships between objects in space and the contradictions between them.   Sarah Sze international art career started in the 1990s. In 2003 she won the won the MacArthur Fellowship. In 2013 she represented the USA at the at the Venice Biennale. She… Read More »Before, During and ‘Afterimage’ – a review of Sarah Sze exhibition at Victoria Miro Gallery, London.

Picasso paints want he knows rather what he sees

Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy, Tate Modern (8th March – 9th September)       The subject of this exhibition ‘Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy,’ is the influence of love, fame and tragedy on Picasso’s painting over a one year period.  This year-long output is a rich visual diary which gives away a great deal about the artist; from his professional career to the way he worked and his personal life.  There are more the one hundred pieces of artwork, showing his entanglements with love and fame, his convolutions with colour and form, and his intricacies as the 20th century’s most influential artist.     Using this review, I am seeking… Read More »Picasso paints want he knows rather what he sees

A painting paradise – A review of Peter Doig exhibition at Michael Werner, London

A fictional world of colourful hues surrounds me as I go from one work to another.  I feel like I’m between cultures and countries at Peter Doig’s show at the Michael Werner Gallery, London.  Peter Doig born in 1959 in Edinburgh, has lived in Trinidad since 2002.  He studied at Wimbledon School of Art, Saint Martins School of Art and Chelsea School of Art. He is a professor at the Fine Arts Academy in Dusseldorf, Germany.  In reviewing this exhibition, I’m interested in contemplating Peter Doig methods, techniques, and content in order to consider how an acclaimed artist approaches the process of painting in paradise. Looking at Peter’s, Red Man (Sings Calypso) 2017,… Read More »A painting paradise – A review of Peter Doig exhibition at Michael Werner, London

Rose Wylie exhibition review; the benefits of having a independent studio practice

Quack, Quack, 30 November 2017 – 11 February 2018, Serpentine Sackler Gallery. Rose Wylie was born in 1934 in Kent. She studied in Folkestone and Dover School of Art and at the Royal College of Art. After completing her MA at the age of 47, she started her career and since then has spent most of her time in the art world wilderness. In the last few years however, Rose’s career has taken off, and she is receiving deserved recognition. She has won the Charles Wollaston 2011 and the John Moores 2014 prizes and has her latest show at the Serpentine in the Sackler Gallery. Rose Wylie’s work is a… Read More »Rose Wylie exhibition review; the benefits of having a independent studio practice

The spaces we live and survive in – Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain (12 September 2017 – 21 January 2018)

Rachel Whiteread was born in 1963 and grew up in London.  After studying painting at Brighton Polytechnic she enrolled on a sculpture masters at Slade School of Art.  Rachel takes casts of familiar objects like hot water bottles and furniture. She uses the traditional casting processes of plaster, resin, rubber and concrete to encourage the viewer to rethink their spatial relationship with everyday forms. In this review of Rachel’s exhibition at the Tate Britain gallery in London, I’m interested in exploring what it is that is so intriguing about Rachel’s exploration of space and what I can learn from her approach to making art.   Tate Britain is the home of British art from 1500 to… Read More »The spaces we live and survive in – Rachel Whiteread at Tate Britain (12 September 2017 – 21 January 2018)

Review – Transient Space at the Parafin Gallery, London

I often walk the streets of London and wonder about the space I am looking at and the transient passing of time.  I wonder what I should take from my short lived fleeting moments.  This is the subject of a group show at Parafin Gallery in London titled the ‘Transient Space’ as artists Mike Ballard, Nathan Coley, Keith Coventry, Tim Head, Melanie Manchat and Abigail Reynolds explore the space in the city.   Parafin Gallery just off Bond Street has been open for three years and shows emerging and established artists.  While I was there, I felt that l had the two floors to myself in the slender venue with plenty… Read More »Review – Transient Space at the Parafin Gallery, London